Who could deny that salads are good for you? How could raw vegetables be a bad thing? Particularly when not overwhelmed by a mucus-forming, creamy, high-calorie dressing?

I say that different people need to exercise different degrees of moderation in all things. More raw food is probably great for someone with heat imbalance. Someone who needs the cooling influence of raw food may have a short fuse, a red face, tendency towards heartburn, and/or excessive body heat. Raw plant matter requires extra effort in digestion to liberate the nutrients from inside the cell wall. When a body has plenty of vigor and stored fuel, this can be a good thing for weight reduction.

When someone is drained, pale, tends to feel cold, is prone to indigestion–but not the sharp heat of heartburn, more like a prolonged dull pain of bloating–then a daily salad could be the worst thing for them. When digestion is weakened, so is the body. When the body is already weakened, it is not a good idea to make it work harder for its nutrition. If you’re overweight and wonder why eating salad all the time made you feel terrible, that’s why. It probably is not right for your body type.

I’m not saying meat and starch is the answer, either. Eating lots of vegetables¬†is¬†generally a good thing. But maybe, instead of mixing them in a salad bowl straight out of the fridge, you can toss ’em in a wok for just a minute or so, to get a little wilt and color bloom. They don’t have to be mushy, just not stone cold and raw. I’ve never cooked lettuce, but kale, cabbage, chard, spinach? Sure.

A patient recently told me, “Hey, remember how you told me to not eat raw food? I didn’t for a while, and it was good. But then I did last week, because that’s what I eat in the morning, and the symptoms were worse.” I get it, habits can be tough to make and break, and raw food is pretty easy! But do listen to your body. If it isn’t happy, try a change for a couple of weeks and see what happens. We are all works in progress.