Go read this before the NYT starts requiring a password to access the archives: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/06/opinion/06kristof.html?sudsredirect=true

“What if breast cancer in the United States has less to do with insurance or mammograms and more to do with contaminants in our water or air — or in certain plastic containers in our kitchens?” A leading question, for sure, but it is notable that puberty is happening earlier and earlier in girls, and there are more and more common chemicals that were not around 50 years ago. An easy thing you can do to reduce your exposure is check your food containers. Plastics of grades 3, 6, and 7, should be discarded if they are not labeled BPA-free. 1, 2, 4, and 5 are considered safer. Do not microwave food in plastic containers or put plastic in the dishwasher. Stop buying bottled water and start carrying a reusable water bottle. (Bottled water is an ecological nightmare, anyway. Get a filter if you don’t like the way water tastes from the faucet.)

And a note on more physical environmental concerns, I’m trying to do some serious housecleaning and decluttering. I was trying to cram too many boxes under my bed, and one of them stuck out a bit from the edge. Not enough to be visibly that bad, but the extra inch or two I had to twist to avoid it while getting out of bed made a difference! My SI joints have been much happier since I admitted those boxes don’t all fit and moved them around so the remaining ones are all the way under the bed.

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